Saturday, January 16, 2010

Sign of the Times: Just in case


A two year old Haitian boy rescued after two days rejoins his mother.
Courtesy the UK Daily Mail

Just a quick reminder if you haven't done so or wish to make another quick cash contribution.  All you need to do is reach for your phone and text just the word "Haiti" to 20222.  For the moment this is maybe the best many of us can do.  Please pass the word.  And hit the mobile before you forget to make an immediate $10 donation.


A text will come back asking you to confirm and the total is added to your bill when you reply YES.  http://hmgf.org/t/ shows those details.


With a little help from our friends

Ethan Chazin offered us his newsletter as a public service to provide insight into working effectively in seeking and identifying job opportunities.  Considering the challenging economy and double digit unemployment, we think people can use all they help they can get.  Feel free to download, email and print for distribution.

Ethan has previously conducted workshops in Hoboken and may do so again in the future.  We'll let the readers know when any opportunity presents itself.  Thanks Ethan!

ChazinGroup Connections Newsletter Jan2010

All eyes on Mass

The other day we saw a post by the jolly green giant at the Hoboken Journal on some remarks by Pat Robertson on an old generational tale about a pact made with the devil to free Haiti from French rule.  Considering most Americans probably didn't know the guy was still alive, the attention the old guy received is pretty amazing.  It got Da Horsey to wondering about more timely comments by relevant cultural and publicly elected officials.  And we came across this gem by the current Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley who is running for US Senate or as CNN analyst David Gergen put it, for "Ted Kennedy's seat."  We have to wonder if this type of religious intolerance will generate similar consternation among the political and journalistic elite.  We're going to take a wild stab here that between Bill Maher, Jon Stewart, and the Boston Globe among others, it won't.

Then there's this video that has gone viral generating hundreds of thousands of hits in just a couple of days.  A Coakley campaign aide is seen knocking down a reporter who was following up on a question asked (and ignored) not minutes earlier.  You can see the reporter holding up a recorder as he is approached from behind and knocked over.  After he is "helped up" by the campaign person, he struggles to get away from his "helper" and escapes by running behind some oncoming pedestrians.  We understand this campaign aide, Michael Meehan is also an Obama nominee for the Broadcasting Board of Governors.  It's doubtful that many in the media will be getting wee weed up over this either.



Massachusetts AG Martha Coakley pictured left as her campaign aide Michael Meehan stands over the knocked down reporter.  She later claimed to know nothing about it.  The special election for the open people's seat for US Senate is on Tuesday.  President Clinton has already gone to Boston and the AP reported President Obama arrives tomorrow to campaign on her behalf.  Although there is less than 15% registered Republicans in the state, challenger Scott Brown is posing a surprising strong run.  We'd sooner believe Bill Maher would make a public attack on muslims than see a Scott Brown victory in Massachusetts.  But status quo machine politics just don't seem up to The Chicago Way standards of late.  Tuesday night should prove interesting.

Update 6:01 - The race just got even more interesting.  Scott Brown has filed an ethics complaint that the SEIU (Service Employees International Union) used state resources to urge workers to volunteer for Martha Coakley's campaign via state computers and email.  The Coakley campaign declined to comment and referred the matter to the Attorney General's office.  Martha Coakley is the Attorney General.  The Wall St. Journal did a piece just yesterday on her avoidance to pursue three major corruption cases and another story detailed a very questionable case on prosecuting a family.