Friday, September 28, 2012

FBI informant Solomon Dwek faces sentencing next month

Solomon Dwek, the FBI informant who became the linchpin in the government's biggest corruption sting in New Jersey history will be facing the music for his own misdeeds next month when he is sentenced at US District Court in Newark.

Back in 2006, Dwek ran a real estate ponzi scheme and was caught depositing a fraudulent $25 million check at a drive by bank window.  The next day he returned depositing another fraudulent check for the same amount as he was wiring money out.

FBI informant Solomon Dwek at the 2010 trial
of Jersey City Deputy Mayor Leona Beldini


An excerpt from from the Star Ledger story:

After his arrest, Dwek secretly entered into a cooperation deal with the U.S. Attorney and became an undercover informant. He spent three years wearing a wire for the FBI as part of a sweeping corruption and money-laundering sting that targeted politicians, candidates for office, religious figures in his Orthodox community, and ultimately a man who arranged black market kidney transplants.
Posing as a corrupt developer, he offered cash bribes to dozens of elected officials and candidates for office to expedite phony real estate projects. At the same time, he set up former business partners, rabbis and others who helped him launder millions more through religious charities and organizations.
The sting became public in July 2009, when three mayors, two legislators, five Orthodox rabbis and dozens of others were arrested in a case that made national headlines.

Dwek hopes his three year efforts on behalf of the government will see a reduced sentence from his plea deal of nine to eleven years.

It's also been three years since Dwek made his rounds in Hoboken and Hudson County.
Ted Sherman's, a co-author of "The Jersey Sting" has filed the full story for the Star Ledger:

http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2012/09/fbi_informant_solomon_dwek_to.html

Talking Ed Note: Horse Sense gets the feeling that as one door closes, another opens.

Photo courtesy NJ.com by arrangement