Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Dr. Toback evaluates HoLA expansion versus the guy from the bathtub

There's a new Old Guard style political fight being waged on the question of expanding the HoLA school.  As it proposes to expand upper grades, it's said there is dwindling enrollments and test scores against its peers being immediate problems with upheaval the administrative constant.

Enter a bitter BoE losing candidate who lacked credibility when proposing to the public a trifecta of dads should be able to have public pool time for their kids except they should not be required to obtain insurance in order to do so in a staged political attack of embarrassing proportions.

So there's already a rumor mill of misinformation saying the State review of any HoLa expansion is not in fact something the statewide education administrators will evaluate but it's doomed to be stopped by the Hoboken BoE, re: Kids First.

Asking the basic question on who the letter below is directed to yielded nothing but crickets as the cry from a guy who rants from a bathtub (and other places) is attempting to lead a charge pointing in a misdirection he can get others to emote toward with rants he of course hopes to see aplenty.

Do you want to believe the basic fact of who a letter is directed among other statewide officials in education as being the real evaluators or do you want to believe the guy who makes his living by encouraging families to leave Hoboken so he can make double-ended commissions?

Should Hoboken endorse unlimited charters classes with a dozen kids or less ad infinitum? Just some of the issues at hand as the State of NJ considers HoLa's request.

HoLA currently has dwindling enrollment with two fifth grade classes of nine (9) students each?
So where will they get more kids to fill these small classes?  Clearly, they will go out of Hoboken to fish for more students to make their "new" expansion viable.

What do you think that would mean?  More competition for dwindling facilities/resources and yes, more taxes.  Should Hoboken taxpayers pay more for this inefficient model?  What parent would not want others to pay for more classes of an isolated, small ten student class?  The question is why should the whole Hoboken school district be burdened in such a way?

Dr. Toback writes to the Commissioner of Education, Christopher Cerf saying a study should precede any charter application being approved.  He makes the case specifically noting the unique situation in Hoboken where four public school districts operate in one square mile.

Should Hoboken taxpayers fund unlimited charter schools expansion on request? It's one question among many as the facilities and funding reach their limit.

While supporting charters, as MSV has, there is a critical mass to consider and the question is, has it already been reached?